Local News

A product some farmers used this year to protect crops has generated hundreds complaints in Arkansas and Missouri. But here in Illinois, the Illinois Department of Agriculture had only received a half-dozen complaints of alleged dicamba spray drift at the end of last week. Brad Clow, a crops claims manager with Country Financial, says if you farm and believe your crops may have suffered damage from alleged dicamba spray drift, it’s best to file a claim;

 

Clow explains the process for a farmer who may have caused damage to another field from dicamba drift.

 



A-P-H stands for actual production history on a particular farm. Some crop protection products containing dicamba can be used on soybeans to kill weeds that have become resistant to the popular herbicide known as glyphosate or 'RoundUp' as it's commonly known. Farmers and others can access more information on the issue from the Illinois Farm Bureau at ilfb.org/steward. 

 

 
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