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LOS ANGELES, Calif. (AP) — Police in California announced two arrests and the return of a pair of unique lizards that were stolen from a reptile shop last year.

The Long Beach Police Department said Friday that the two Australian lace monitor lizards were stolen from JTK Reptiles in Long Beach in November, The Los Angeles Times reports.

The lizards, which can grow to be more than 6 feet (1.83 meters) long, were valued together at $75,000.

Three people entered the store, broke into the cages holding the lizards and escaped to a waiting car, authorities said.

Police tracked the lizards to a Panorama City house Sept. 23. Jose Luis Macias Jr., 30, and Kassandra Marie Duenas, 27, who were in the house at the time, were arrested and charged with second-degree robbery.

Both men were released on $50,000 bail, police said.

Animal control handlers were called to recover the lizards before being returned to their owner, Long Beach Police Department spokesman Brandon Fahey said.

The suspects “seem to be knowledgeable about lizards and lizard value and lizard selling," Fahey said.

Fahey declined to say how detectives found the animals.

“As far as I know, the lizards were A-OK,” Fahey said. “We lucked out there.”

The store owner declined to comment Monday.

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JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — A magnitude 7.5 earthquake prompted a tsunami warning Monday for a nearly thousand-mile stretch of Alaska’s southern coast, with waves over 2 feet at the nearest community as the threat subsided.

The quake was centered near Sand Point, a city of about 900 people off the Alaska Peninsula where wave levels late Monday topped 2 feet (0.61 meters), according to the National Tsunami Warning Center. The warning was downgraded to an advisory just over two hours after the quake hit.

“It was a pretty good shaker here,” said David Adams, co-manager of Marine View Bed and Breakfast in Sand Point. “You could see the water kind of shaking and shimmering during the quake. Our truck was swaying big time.”

Adams didn’t take any photos or video: “It just kind of happened all of a sudden.”

The quake struck in the North Pacific Ocean just before 1 p.m. It was centered about 67 miles (118 kilometers) southeast of Sand Point, according to the Alaska Earthquake Center. The community is about 800 miles (1,288 km) southwest of Anchorage. The quake was recorded at a depth of 19 miles (30 kilometers).

The National Tsunami Warning Center in Palmer, Alaska, said the tsunami warning — and later advisory — was in effect for roughly 950 miles (1,529 kilometers), from 40 miles (64 kilometers) southeast of Homer to Unimak Pass, about 80 miles (129 km) northeast of Unalaska.

The quake was felt widely in communities along the southern coast, including Sand Point, Chignik, Unalaska and the Kenai Peninsula, according to the Alaska Earthquake Center, which said a magnitude 5.2 aftershock was reported 11 minutes later, centered roughly in the same area.

Patrick Mayer, superintendent of the Aleutians East Borough School District, said parents picked up their children from Sand Point School, which also served an evacuation point. The earthquake was felt to varying degrees at the other four schools in the district, the closest of which is 90 miles away, he said.

Mayer said a school bus was dispatched to a fish processing facility to bring workers to the school since it's on high ground.

The workers were to wear masks to protect against the spread of the coronavirus, he said, in a community where there have been only “limited cases.”

Public safety officials in King Cove urged residents to remain vigilant after the warning was downgraded and to stay off the beach and out of harbors and marinas. Waves by late afternoon in King Cove were less than 2 feet (0.61 meters), according to the National Tsunami Warning Center.

The size of the quake was originally reported to have been a magnitude of 7.4, but was revised to a 7.5, said Paul Caruso, a geophysicist with the U.S. Geological Survey. He said an earthquake of this size, in this area, is not a surprise.

“This is an area where the Pacific Plate is subducting underneath the North American Plate. And because of that, the Pacific Plate actually goes underneath the North American Plate, where it melts,” Caruso said, noting that’s why there are volcanoes in the region. “And so we commonly have large, magnitude 7 earthquakes in that area.”

Rita Tungul, front desk assistant at the Grand Aleutian Hotel in Unalaska, said she felt some shaking but it wasn’t strong. Her coworker didn’t feel the quake at all, she said.

Connie Newton, owner of the Bearfoot Inn, a grocery store, liquor store and small hotel in Cold Bay, said the temblor it felt like someone drove into her building with a truck. Still, nothing fell to the ground and she said she suffered no damage because she earthquake-proofed her stores by installing 2-inch (5-cm) risers around the outside of her shelves.

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Associated Press journalists Jennifer Sinco Kelleher, Audrey McAvoy and Caleb Jones in Honolulu and Mark Thiessen in Anchorage contributed to this report.

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SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — San Francisco police have made an arrest in the weekend assault of a Trump supporter and free speech rally organizer who lost two front teeth, officials said Monday.

San Francisco police said they arrested Adora Anderson, 35, of Watsonville in Oakland on Sunday. He was booked into the San Francisco jail on charges of mayhem with a hate crime enhancement.

The organizer of Saturday’s event in downtown San Francisco, Philip Anderson of Team Save America, posted photos to social media of his bloody mouth with a front tooth missing and another hanging loosely. He said anti-fascist protesters attacked him “for no reason.”

Several hundred counter-protesters surged into the area for the 1 p.m. event, overwhelming the handful of conservative activists. Counter-protesters threw glass bottles, filled plastic bottles, metal cans and eggs, said police. The event was quickly canceled as a public safety hazard.

Three San Francisco officers were injured when they were assaulted with pepper spray and caustic chemicals.

Team Save America organized the rally to protest Twitter, which it said squelches conservative speech. Members of the group wore red “Make America Great Again” Trump campaign hats and carried pro-police “Thin Blue Line” flags and U.S. flags.

It was not immediately known if Adora Anderson had a lawyer who could speak on his behalf.

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NEW YORK (AP) — Author-commentator Jeffrey Toobin has been suspended by the New Yorker and is stepping away from his job as CNN's senior legal analyst pending what the cable network is calling a “personal matter.”

Vice reported earlier Monday that Toobin had exposed himself during a Zoom meeting with staffers of the New Yorker and WNYC radio. In a statement Monday afternoon, the New Yorker said Toobin had been “suspended while we investigate the matter.” It declined further comment. A CNN spokesperson said in a statement that "Jeff Toobin has asked for some time off while he deals with a personal issue, which we have granted.”

The 60-year-old Toobin has been a New Yorker writer for more than 20 years and joined CNN in 2002. He is the author of several books, most recently “True Crimes and Misdemeanors: The Investigation of Donald Trump," published in August. His other works include “The Run of His Life: The People v. O. J. Simpson” and “The Nine: Inside the Secret World of the Supreme Court."

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AP Media Writer David Bauder contributed to this report.

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The headline of this story has been corrected to show that the New Yorker suspended Jeffrey Toobin and he is stepping away from his CNN role for a “personal matter.”

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SPRINGDALE, Utah (AP) — A California woman who was missing for about two weeks in Zion National Park in Utah has been found and left the park with her family who had feared the worst, authorities said.

Holly Suzanne Courtier, 38, of Los Angeles, was found Sunday by search and rescue crews after park rangers received a tip that she had been seen in the park, Zion National Park officials said in a news release. They didn't say where she was found or anything about her condition or what had happened.

Crews began searching for Courtier after she didn’t show up for her scheduled pickup in the park by a private shuttle on Oct. 6, authorities said. The park and nearby town of Springdale were filled with missing person signs featuring pictures of Courtier and the clothes she was wearing.

Her sister, Jillian Courtier-Oliver, told ABC's “Good Morning America" that her sister is recovering after being found with bruises all over her body and losing weight.

Courtier-Oliver said she had started losing hope her sister was alive in a park known for its towering red rock cliffs that has several hikes that take people along narrow trails with steep drops nearby.

“It wasn’t until two days ago I actually said, ‘I’m starting to lose hope,’ ” she said. “They had a lot of cadaver dogs out, and I knew what they were looking for was a body, not a person. It was the first time I actually started losing hope. And I went with up with so much help knowing that we needed to find her.”

The park released a statement attributed to the family.

“We would like to thank the rangers and search teams who relentlessly looked for her day and night and never gave up hope. We are also so grateful to the countless volunteers who were generous with their time, resources and support,” her family said in statement.

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DETROIT (AP) — A 20-year-old suburban Detroit woman who was declared dead only to be found alive at a funeral home in August has died, the attorney representing her family said Monday.

Timesha Beauchamp died Sunday at Children’s Hospital in Detroit, Geoffrey Fieger said in a news release.

Beauchamp's family, who live in Southfield, called 911 on Aug. 23 because she appeared to be suffering from serious breathing problems. Emergency medical technicians and paramedics responded, and a doctor who didn’t attend the scene pronounced Beauchamp deceased after one of the first responders reported by telephone that she had been unresponsive for 30 minutes and showed no signs of life.

Beauchamp wasn’t taken to a hospital until an hour later when Cole Funeral Home in Detroit called 911. The state said funeral home staff saw her chest moving when they went to collect her from her Southfield home.

She had been hospitalized in critical condition ever since.

Beauchamp’s family said in a statement Monday that they are “devastated” by her death.

“This is the second time our beloved Timesha has been pronounced dead, but this time she isn’t coming back,” the family said.

Beauchamp had cerebral palsy.

The family has filed a $50 million federal lawsuit against the city of Southfield and the four first responders who attended to Beauchamp.

“She died as a result of massive brain damage that was suffered when Southfield paramedics wrongly declared her dead, and failed to provide her much needed oxygen,” Fieger said. “Instead, she was sent to a funeral home which then discovered that her eyes were open, and that she was alive.”

Southfield Fire Chief Johnny Menifee has said the city was investigating the case. He told reporters in late August that Beauchamp might have been found alive due to “Lazarus syndrome,” in which people come back to life without assistance after attempts to resuscitate have failed.

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DENVER (AP) — A television station security guard accused of fatally shooting a pro-police demonstrator following opposing rallies was charged Monday with second-degree murder, according to the Denver district court clerk’s office.

The charges in the death of Lee Keltner, 49, were filed to the district court against Matthew Dolloff, 30, who was protecting a KUSA-TV producer at the time of the incident.

The next hearing is set for Wednesday morning, according to the district court clerk’s office. No attorney has been listed for Dolloff yet in court records.

People convicted of second-degree murder face a mandatory sentence of between 16 and 48 years in prison.

William Boyle, a lawyer for Keltner’s widow, said Friday that he thinks the evidence available supports a second-degree murder charge.

Under Colorado law, second-degree murder is defined as knowingly killing someone but without the deliberation prosecutors are required to prove in first-degree murder cases.

Boyle said he has reached out to KUSA-TV, Pinkerton and Isborn Security, the security company that said it hired Dolloff for the work as a contractor to Pinkerton, seeking more information about their actions. He said he did not immediately hear back from them and that a lawsuit against any entity involved in allowing Dolloff to work without a license was a possibility in order to “open a conversation.”

“We are just trying to find out exactly what happened, why it happened and who is responsible for creating the situation that resulted in Mr. Keltner’s death,” he said.

Police say Keltner was in a verbal dispute with a 27-year-old man as the rallies broke up Saturday when Dolloff and a 25-year-old person got into an altercation with Keltner.

Keltner slapped Dolloff in the head and Dolloff pulled out a semiautomatic handgun and shot Keltner as Keltner discharged pepper spray at him, police said in an arrest affidavit.

A cellphone video taken by KUSA’s producer suggests that Keltner was upset that his dispute with the first man was being recorded by cameras.

It shows Keltner in a confrontation with a man wearing a T-shirt that read, “Black Guns Matter.” A bystander is trying to defuse the argument, which occurred after a “Patriot Muster” demonstration and “BLM-Antifa Soup Drive” counterprotest downtown.

The video then shows Keltner, holding a spray can, walking out of view. A man’s voice — it’s unclear if it’s Keltner — is heard saying the area was no place for cameras.

“Get the cameras out of here or I’m going to f—- you up,” the unidentified man says. Keltner and Dolloff are then shown scuffling before the video stops.

The producer resumes filming after the shooting and tells arriving police that he is with the press and says of the man who was shot, “That guy was going to get me.” He also says the security guard shot Keltner because Keltner used mace.

Someone out of view can also be heard saying “he’s got magazines in his coat” but it is not clear who the person is talking about.

Police said they found two guns but they have not explained who they belonged to.

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Nieberg is a corps member for the Associated Press/Report for America Statehouse News Initiative. Report for America is a nonprofit national service program that places journalists in local newsrooms to report on undercovered issues.

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LOS ANGELES (AP) — Authorities arrested a sexual assault suspect early Monday on the Paramount Pictures studio lot in Hollywood after a two-hour standoff with police, officials said.

The suspect, 36-year-old Bryan Gudiel Barrios, works on the studio lot but it is not clear if he is a contractor or employee of Paramount Pictures, Fullerton Police Cpl. Billy Phu said.

Barrios is accused of sexually assaulting a minor, Phu said. Barrios was being treated at the hospital after cutting himself with a knife and is expected to survive the wounds.

The confrontation began around 10 p.m. Sunday when Fullerton officers attempted to detain Barrios and he pulled out a knife, the Los Angeles Police Department said in Twitter posts.

The Fullerton officers used a Taser and requested assistance from the LAPD, who fired so-called less-lethal munitions that were ineffective.

At least one LAPD officer fired their gun during the incident at the lot's Melrose Avenue gate before Barrios ran onto the lot and barricaded himself inside a building. Barrios was not shot.

Officers attempted to negotiate a surrender and around 12:15 a.m. entered the building and took Barrios, who was bleeding from the knife wounds, into custody.

No officers were injured.

It was not immediately clear if Barrios had an attorney who could speak on his behalf.

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CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — A monitor appointed to oversee the handling of sexual abuse claims at St. Paul's School in New Hampshire has resigned, accusing campus officials of thwarting his efforts.

Jeffrey Maher was appointed as the school’s independent compliance overseer last year as part of an agreement with the attorney general’s office that subjected the school in Concord to up to five years of government oversight in lieu of criminal charges. The 2018 agreement followed an investigation that found credible evidence of abuse involving 20 former faculty members over several decades.

Maher, a former college safety director and police captain, resigned Monday, citing what he called “an intolerable working environment.” He said school leadership questioned many conditions of the agreement, discouraged investigations that could have legal impacts and tried to limit his access to information. He said an administrator publicly berated him and that he was retaliated against for trying to do his job.

Maher also said he is facing a “seemingly orchestrated threat” of a civil lawsuit by an administrator.

“I have been criticized and accused of exceeding the scope of my responsibilities,” he wrote. “It would seem such accusations arrive only when I am less than laudatory of the school’s policies and protocols.”

In a statement, the school said it had raised concerned with the attorney general earlier this month about Maher acting outside of his role. It denied all of his allegations, saying it has initiated numerous investigations into misconduct allegations. And it said if school officials had questioned conditions of the agreement, Maher would have been obligated to document those concerns in his bi-annual reports, none of which included such allegations.

"We believe that the school has complied with all of its obligations under the Settlement Agreement and will continue to honor these obligations going forward," the school said.

Attorney General Gordon MacDonald said Maher’s resignation letter raises very serious concerns, and that his office is working with the school to address the future of the settlement agreement and the role of the compliance overseer. He thanked Maher for his work, “particularly in the face of what had plainly become an untenable situation.”

Maher’s job included regularly reporting the status of the school’s compliance with the agreement. His most recent report, in January, said the school was doing a better job of addressing complaints but should improve its policies around investigating crimes and assisting victims.

The report also said the school received 31 incident reports over the last six months of 2019. The incidents, mostly involving sexual or physical assault, occurred on and off the campus. More than half were incidents that happened in the past, but the report did not give a time frame.

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EAST RIDGE, Tenn. (AP) — Police fatally shot a suspect accused of shooting a Tennessee officer during a traffic stop, authorities said.

East Ridge Police Corporal Terry Prescott was wounded Sunday afternoon after stopping a red Dodge Challenger in the parking lot of a CVS pharmacy, police told news outlets.

Police Chief Stan Allen said the suspect, later identified as Christopher J. Kitts, 43, jumped out of the Challenger, fired several shots at Prescott's patrol car and then drove away. Prescott was taken to a hospital and listed in stable condition.

The Georgia State Patrol later located the deserted Challenger across the state line in a subdivision in Rossville.

Multiple law enforcement agencies conducted an extensive air and ground search and found Kitts, who engaged officers several times with gunfire before he was shot, East Ridge Police said Monday morning in a statement on Facebook. Kitts was pronounced dead at the scene.

Police did not say where Kitts was shot, but the statement said information on law enforcement actions inside Georgia would likely come from Catoosa County officials.

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HARRISONBURG, Va. (AP) — Fire officials have determined there are no additional victims from a weekend explosion and fire that injured five people in Virginia, the city of Harrisonburg announced Sunday night.

Two people were flown to University of Virginia’s medical center in serious condition after the explosion and fire rocked a strip mall Saturday morning, officials said. A message left Sunday with the medical center was not immediately returned.

The three other victims sustained non-life-threatening injuries.

“The Harrisonburg Fire Department has completed its secondary search of the Miller Circle fire site, and has determined that there are no additional individuals on site who were harmed by the incident. Searches are now complete,” the city tweeted Sunday.

The blast was so strong that some residents reported their homes shaking. Nearby businesses were forced to close due to damage, TV station WHSV reported.

The city said an investigation into the cause is ongoing. Officials said Saturday it would likely take several days.

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CHICAGO (AP) — A blogger from Singapore who was granted asylum to stay in the U.S. faces child pornography charges, according to prosecutors.

Amos Yee appeared Friday in court in Chicago on solicitation and possession of child pornography, according to the Chicago Sun-Times. He was being held on $1 million bail.

If the 20-year-old is convicted, he could lose his asylum status. He was taken into custody Thursday at his Chicago home.

In 2016, Yee was detained at O'Hare International Airport after fleeing Singapore. His online posts mocking and criticizing the Singapore government twice landed him in jail. He was granted asylum i n September 2017.

Prosecutors alleged he exchanged messages with a 14-year-old Texas girl last year that included nude photos. He also allegedly used his now-defunct YouTube channel to advocate for pedophilia, according to prosecutors.

In court, Yee’s assistant public defender called him an “internet troll” who’s “all over the internet saying fantastic things.”

Yee made several attempts to defend himself during the hearing, prompting his assistant public defender to tell him to keep his “mouth shut," according to the newspaper.

Yee has been banned from using the internet while awaiting trial. His next court date was set for Nov. 5.

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CHICAGO (AP) — A blogger from Singapore who was granted asylum to stay in the U.S. faces child pornography charges, according to prosecutors.

Amos Yee appeared Friday in court in Chicago on solicitation and possession of child pornography, according to the Chicago Sun-Times. He was being held on $1 million bail.

If the 20-year-old is convicted, he could lose his asylum status. He was taken into custody Thursday at his Chicago home.

In 2016, Yee was detained at O'Hare International Airport after fleeing Singapore. His online posts mocking and criticizing the Singapore government twice landed him in jail. He was granted asylum i n September 2017.

Prosecutors alleged he exchanged messages with a 14-year-old Texas girl last year that included nude photos. He also allegedly used his now-defunct YouTube channel to advocate for pedophilia, according to prosecutors.

In court, Yee’s assistant public defender called him an “internet troll” who’s “all over the internet saying fantastic things.”

Yee made several attempts to defend himself during the hearing, prompting his assistant public defender to tell him to keep his “mouth shut," according to the newspaper.

Yee has been banned from using the internet while awaiting trial.

His next court date was set for Nov. 5.

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CHICAGO (AP) — A newborn boy delivered after his mother was fatally shot last week in Chicago has died, authorities confirmed Sunday.

Chicago police said the baby died Saturday. He was 4 days old.

He was delivered Tuesday in critical condition after his mother, 35-year-old Stacey Jones, was shot twice in the back while standing outside her home on the city’s South Side. She was eight months pregnant and pronounced dead at a hospital.

Jones’ other two children were sleeping inside the home and were unharmed, according to the Chicago Tribune.

Jones moved to Chicago from Tennessee two years ago and had accepted a position as a Cook County probation officer, her father, Tommy Baker, said.

“You took something from my family, from me. You took my heart, my firstborn, the sweetest little thing," Baker told the newspaper. “It’s a loss that I’ll never get over.”

No charges have been announced. A person of interest was questioned last week and released without charges.

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MIAMI, Fla. (AP) — A Carnival Cruise Line ship rescued two dozen people, including two children, from a sinking boat 37 miles (about 60 kilometers) off the Florida coast, the cruise line reported Saturday.

It was not immediately clear why the smaller boat came under distress, but its passengers were taken on board the Carnival Sensation when the boat started taking on water. They were given life jackets, food, water and blankets.

The Miami Herald said the passengers were later transferred to the U.S. Coast Guard.

The cruise ship was in international waters 37 miles off the coast of Palm Beach when it came upon the struggling boat, whose passengers were of various nationalities, cruise line officials said. They were evaluated and quarantined from the crew.

Carnival cruise ships aren't yet in service and had no guests on board when it came to the smaller boat's aid.

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MESA, Ariz. (AP) — Police in the Phoenix suburb of Mesa are asking for the public’s help in identifying a drive-by shooter who opened fire on a food truck seating area and wounded seven people including three young children.

They said an unidentified person in an SUV stopped in the roadway and shot into a crowd of people eating outside food trucks in the parking lot about 9:30 p.m. Friday before speeding off.

Wounded were three adults, a 16-year-old and children ages 1, 6 and 9 who were not all from the same family.

Mesa Police Chief Ken Cost said Saturday the 1-year-old child remained in extremely critical condition.

He said the other injuries ranged from minor to severe, but none were believed to be life threatening.

The names of the seven wounded people haven't been released by police.

Cost said a man was seen assaulting a woman at the same location earlier Friday night and one of the food vendors and other bystanders intervened.

Investigators haven’t tied the incident to the shooting, but also haven’t ruled it out.

Police are looking for “anyone and everyone” who may have witnessed the fight or the shooting to contact police, Cost said, adding that any details, videos or photos might lead to an arrest.

“They shot children and it’s unacceptable,” Cost said. “You need to come forward and do the right thing ... Help us bring justice to these family members who had their children shot.”

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OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — A second excavation begins Monday at a cemetery in an effort to find and identify victims of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre and shed light on violence that left hundreds dead and decimated an area that was once a cultural and economic mecca for African Americans.

“I realize we can tell this story the way it needs to be told, now,” said Phoebe Stubblefield, a forensic anthropologist at the University of Florida and a descendant of a survivor of the massacre who is assisting the search, told The Associated Press. ”The story is no longer hidden. We’re putting the completion on this event."

The violence happened on May 31 and June 1 in 1921, when a white mob attacked Tulsa’s Black Wall Street, killing an estimated 300 people and wounding 800 more while robbing and burning businesses, homes and churches.

“People, they were just robbed, white people coming in saying Black people had better property than they had and that that was just not right,” said Stubblefield, whose great-aunt Anna Walker Woods had her home burned and property taken. “Burning, thieving, killing wasn’t enough. They had to prevent Black people from recovering.

“Personally, professionally, spiritually I have an investment in this,” said Stubblefield, a Los Angeles native who said she is in her early 50s and learned of the massacre and her ancestor, who she doesn’t recall ever meeting, in the 1990s.

The two locations to be searched are in Oaklawn Cemetery in north Tulsa, where a search for remains of victims ended without success in July, and near the Greenwood District where the massacre took place.

The earlier excavation was done in an area identified by ground-penetrating radar scans as appearing to be a human-dug pit indicative of a mass grave. It turned out be a filled-in creek, said Mayor G.T. Bynum, who first proposed looking for victims of the violence in 2018 and later budgeted $100,000 to fund it after previous searches failed to find victims.

The massacre — which happened two years after what is known as the “Red Summer,” when hundreds of African Americans died at the hands of white mobs in violence around the U.S. —- has been depicted in recent HBO shows “Watchmen” and “Lovecraft County.”

It also received renewed attention after President Donald Trump selected Tulsa as the location for a June rally amid a national reckoning over police brutality and racial violence. Trump moved the date to avoid coinciding with a Juneteenth celebration in the Greenwood District commemorating the end of slavery.

Bynum, who is 43, said he didn’t learn of the massacre until about 20 years ago during the mayoral campaign of his uncle Bill LaFortune, and his grandparents confirmed the events.

“That’s a very common thing in Tulsa. That’s how you learned about it, not through books or the media or in school,” Bynum said. “People didn’t start talking about this event in Tulsa until about 20 years ago.”

Bodies, if discovered, will not be disturbed, Bynum said. The excavation would stop, and investigators would "do what they need to do to identify them and determine a cause of death,” Bynum said.

Efforts would also be made to find any descendants, a project that could prove difficult, according to Bynum.

“A hundred years after the fact, the descendants are scattered all around the world. Tracking down the descendants could take years,” Bynum said.

One site to be searched, known as the Original 18, is where old funeral home records indicate up to 18 Black people who were massacre victims were buried. The other site is where a man named Clyde Eddy said in the 1990s that, as a 10-year-old boy, he saw Black bodies being prepared for burial shortly after the massacre, but was told to leave the area.

Archaeologists have identified two additional possible sites, said state archaeologist Kary Stackelbeck, who is leading the investigation.

“We have multiple areas that we have identified as having merits for investigation,” based on the 2019 radar scans, Stackelbeck said. "We just have to ask for grace and patience” during the search.

The latest search is scheduled to last about a week, but could be extended, according to Stubblefield.

“I’m fully prepared to find human remains,” she said. “The questions are just whether they’re the remains we’re looking for.”

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